Nina Dobrev likes a challenge!

The 28-year-old actress is opening up about her decision to leave The Vampire Diaries after starring on The CW show for six seasons, revealing that it was her plan all along to move on, ET Online publishes;

“That was the plan from the get-go,” she says in the September issue of Harper by Harper’s Bazzar — which she guest-edited. “If anything, the fact that [leaving] terrified me drove me even more. I needed to feel that fear of ‘Oh, my God, what if I never get a job again?’ That just made me want to work five times as hard to make sure that didn’t happen.”

Dobrev portrayed Elena Gilbert for six seasons on The Vampire Diaries, shocking fans of the vampire series when she announced in 2015 that she would be departing the show. Since then, she’s taken roles in films such as Crash Pad and xXx: Return of Xander Cage.

“The things I want to do aren’t necessarily the things that are expected of me,” Dobrev confesses. “I don’t want to play a teenager anymore. I want to play adult roles and be challenged and work with great filmmakers and tell incredible stories, and that has meant being really picky.”

Her decision to make a big move in her career also stems from her love of living an adventurous life.

“My rule of thumb is, I’ll try anything once,” she expresses. “I have a healthy — or possibly unhealthy — obsession with trying things for the first time. Nobody imagines me to be by myself backpacking, so they just think, ‘It can’t be her.’”



On August 13th this year the 2017 Teen Choice Awards were held and the cast of The Vampire Diaries won in the following categories;

Choice Sci-Fi/Fantasy TV Show: The Vampire Diaries
Choice Sci-Fi/Fantasy TV Actress: Kat Graham (The Vampire Diaries)



After spending eight years in the supernatural world of The Vampire Diaries — and directing five episodes of the series — Paul Wesley decided to stop through New York to visit the arguably more supernatural world of Shadowhunters. Wesley directed Monday’s episode, which sees Clary and Jace embark on a mission while Simon contemplates telling his family the truth about what he is. But before Wesley could step behind the camera, he had to brush up on the new, very complicated Shadow World. EW.com sits down with Paul Wesley to talk about the differences between directing Shadowhunters and The Vampire Diaries;

“They sent me a PDF with a bit of backstory on all the characters,” Wesley tells EW. “Then, honestly, I went on the Wikipedia page and looked at that.”

Unlike his past experiences on TVD, he not only had to get to know a new world on Shadowhunters, but he also had to get to know the actors. “I don’t know their mannerisms and I don’t really know any of these cast members very well. On The Vampire Diaries, I sort of understood how the actors functioned, so I was able to direct them and guide them,” Wesley says. “There was a bit of an advantage there. With this, it was more acquired knowledge. That was the biggest difference. It was actually, I thought, really refreshing to have to learn a new set of skills.”

One of those skills was directing an hour with a lot of green screen, which required Wesley to put his trust into the digital effects department. Another skill? Directing with the flu. “I was sick,” Wesley says. “I had like a 103-degree fever while I was shooting all those exterior scenes. All these pictures came out where I look like an Eskimo and literally I had a massive flu. It was like -10 out. And it was my first show that I directed outside of the series I had been on and I really wanted it to come out well.”

Shadowhunters airs Mondays at 8 p.m. ET on Freeform.



It’s been more than four months since The Vampire Diaries wrapped its eight-season run on The CW, and some people are still angry about the way things ended for Stefan Salvatore — but his portrayer, Paul Wesley, isn’t one of them. TV Line sits down with Paul Wesley to talk about the series finale and Stefan’s ending;

“It was something I was really hoping for,” Wesley tells TVLine of Stefan’s untimely demise, which came less than 24 hours after he and Caroline Forbes became husband and wife. “I’d put in a good word, because I felt it needed end that way. I thought he really needed to die.”

Unlike many of the fans who forgave Stefan for his (countless) transgressions over the years — because, come on, it’s a show about vampires! — Wesley isn’t about to let his character off so easily.

“It was important poetic justice for all the bad things he’d done,” Wesley continues. “He was a murderer ultimately. He’d found so much redemption, yet was still tormented. For me, him making that ultimate sacrifice was a great way to say goodbye.”
Wesley’s line of thinking certainly lines up with that of showrunner Julie Plec, who had this to say about Stefan’s death back in March: “When we landed on the idea of Caroline needing to leave [Stefan] behind in honor of protecting her family, and then him needing to leave her behind in honor of protecting his, it felt somehow like the responsible outcome of a responsible relationship.”



The Vampire Diaries, Ian Somerhalder and The Originals’ Joseph Morgan have been nominated for a Teen Choice Award presented by FOX. Be sure to vote for them here!



[Spoilers for The Originals follow. Read at your own risk!]

Sometimes you have to dig deep for spoilers on your favorite show, but sometimes they’re accidentally dropped right in your lap, which was the case today for fans of The Originals.
While talking about the end of The Vampire Diaries with Entertainment Weekly at the ATX Television Festival, Julie Plec let it slip that Hope Mikaelson (Summer Fontana) might be Mystic Falls-bound. “Alaric (Matt Davis) and Caroline (Candice King) are running the Salvatore School for the Young and Gifted where Hope Mikael– sh** never mind. Keep watching…”
It’s no surprise that Hope might end up at the Salvatore magic school, given that The Originals has made a point multiple times this season that Hope is lonely without other children around and doesn’t have a great handle on her powers yet. Alaric pretty much gave her an engraved invitation to become a student during his crossover earlier this year.

We’ve also had our suspicions that Season 5 of The Originals could include this magic school storyline (and Caroline Forbes by extension) given how well it fits into the spinoff’s existing plot.

[TV Guide]



On The CW series The Originals, the Mikaelsons are reunited as a family, after five long years apart, and Klaus (Joseph Morgan) must attempt to reconnect with his daughter, Hope (Summer Fontana), who is now seven years old. At the same time, Elijah (Daniel Gillies) tries to determine the best way to protect the family, which is not something that Hayley (Phoebe Tonkin) and Freya (Riley Voelkel) seem to be able to agree on, all while a mysterious witch plans to sacrifice a group of innocent children, including Hope Mikaelson.

During this 1-on-1 phone interview with Collider, actress Phoebe Tonkin talked about the mother-daughter relationship between Hayley and Hope, where Hayley’s focus is, now that she’s reunited the Mikaelsons, how Hayley feels about Klaus, Elijah and Hayley’s tight bond, conflict with Freya, how dangerous this new threat is, whether she would be interested in directing (a few of her co-stars have been directing episodes of the series), and which actor from The Vampire Diaries she’d like to see show up in New Orleans.

Collider: What have you most enjoyed about having the five-year time jump this season? What has it allowed you to get to do, that you wouldn’t have been able to without it?
PHOEBE TONKIN:
I definitely think it’s been really interesting to show Hayley as a mother of a 7-year-old, and the challenges that Hayley’s faced, being responsible for this human being, who has questions of her own about her own family heritage and her own powers, and things like that. It’s created this really nice mother-daughter relationship that wasn’t necessarily there when she was a toddler.

And it must feel quite a bit different, as an actor, to actually have a child to interact and have scenes with, instead of just an infant or toddler.
TONKIN:
That made a very big difference, especially for my character. As lovely as it was, for three seasons, having baby Hope, it brings a different dynamic to the show, having someone that is listening in on conversations and is very much a part of people’s storylines, and not just a sweet little baby in the corner.

Did the five-year time jump feel more like a reset for you, as an actor, and for how you’re approaching your character now? Did it feel like you had to do a lot of figuring out where her head would be, this many years after the last time we saw her?
TONKIN:
I think Hayley spent the last five years doing nothing but trying to get the Mikaelsons back. I hope she at least had a couple of fun mini-vacations with her daughter, but I think she spent five years just trying to get them back. After five years of trying, it was such a big relief for her to finally do that, but it wasn’t so much a reset. Five years is a long time to spend looking for someone, or a bunch of people, so it’s just nice for her to have her life back again.

In the five years that we didn’t get to see exactly what Hayley was up to, what did her best days look like and what did her worst days look like?
TONKIN:
I think her worst and her best days were probably the same. She was in a lot of pain for five years because she was without the people that she loved, who are this family that she’s become a part of. The best days were probably the days where she was getting close to finding out how to break the curse, and the worst days were probably the days that she felt lonely without them.

Hayley spent so much time on saving the Mikaelsons, who in turn saved Klaus. How does she feel about what Klaus went through, in that time, and about Marcel, who was responsible for it all?
TONKIN:
She feels like what Klaus did was very selfless. He sacrificed himself for Hope, really, and for Hope to have some sort of a normal upbringing. Klaus has done some terrible things to a lot of people, but she was so very focused on helping him and saving him. They’re all very dysfunctional. Even her relationship with Marcel is quite dysfunctional, considering he’s the one that ended up doing what he did to Klaus. They’re all terrible people who have done terrible things, but they have this strange relationship with each other.

Hayley has been so focused on the goal of saving the Mikaelsons, so now that she’s done that, what will her focus be next?
TONKIN:
I think keeping her child save is her number one priority, and it always has been. When they were on the run, she wasn’t as worried about keeping Hope safe because there were no Mikaelsons around her to bring in potential threats. So now that they’re back, as great as it is to have her family around her, her main focus is her kid and making sure that her kid is safe.

What is Hayley’s place among the Mikaelson family? Does she know where she fits in, among them?
TONKIN:
I think she definitely feels a bit like the grounded figure. She brings a level of normality to this family. She’s just a mom who wants to protect her kid. That’s really all she wants out of her life, to protect her child. I don’t think she even cares about her love life anymore. She cares about her kid.

How does Hayley feel about Klaus, at this point? Is he just the father of her daughter, or is he the protector of her family?
TONKIN:
She sees a space in family life for Klaus. I don’t think she wants her daughter to grow up without a dad. Hayley grew up without parents, and without a father figure. I don’t think she’ll ever be romantic with him, or maybe she will be, but for right now, she’s just trying to keep everything somewhat calm, so that her daughter has a father who can protect her. Klaus is very strong, which brings a level of protection to Hope, and I think that’s very important to Hayley. They’re trying, in their very unconventional way, to be good parents to Hope.

Where are things at with Hayley and Elijah? Are they finally free to explore what being together would mean for them, or is she really not concerned with her love life, at all?
TONKIN:
I don’t think she’s that concerned with her love life. She has a 7-year-old daughter. There are a lot of threats that come at this family that are very violent and dangerous threats. She loves Elijah very much, but her love for Hope is all-encompassing. Once she finally gets some time with Elijah, which we’ll hopefully see in the next few episodes, there’s a true love and bond between them, but her love is now split, a little bit.

We don’t get to see Hayley and Rebekah together too much. What sort of relationship will they have?
TONKIN:
Rebekah and Hayley don’t have that much together. Hayley and Freya have had quite a lot of stuff this season. They’re both very pivotal in the men’s decisions, and sometimes Hayley and Freya have conflicting opinions. They’ve both been starved of family for so long, in their respective ways, that they feel very protective of their family. They just don’t necessarily see eye to eye on how to support or advise their family members.

When you have two such strong women, like Hayley and Freya, who are unwavering in their own opinions and decisions, how do they move past those moments of tension?
TONKIN:
I think you’re going to see a little bit of that kind of conflict, in the next few episodes. That’s something that we do explore, and that’s really nice to have. Freya and Hayley didn’t have much to do with each other last season, so it’s really nice to play with that, this season.

We know that whatever this new threat in New Orleans is, it’s going to have its sight set on Hope. How dangerous will things get for her, as well as the other children, especially when the Mikaelsons and Hayley are willing to turn to Marcel and Vincent for help?
TONKIN:
Yeah, the big threat this year is probably the most dangerous threat that these characters have seen or heard about, in their entire lives. Anything that involves children is just a different type of stakes. The stakes are so different because these kids can’t protect themselves. We’re not only trying to protect ourselves, but we’re also trying to protect all of these innocent children who haven’t necessarily accessed their powers yet.

Joseph Morgan, Daniel Gillies and Charles Michael Davis are all directing episodes. What’s it like to be directed by your co-stars, and does watching them try their hand at directing an episode of the show inspire you to want to try it yourself, sometime?
TONKIN:
I would love to direct. We’ve been really lucky, on this show, that we have a lot of female writers and we’ve had quite a few female directors. Obviously, Julie Plec is our beautiful female creator. I do feel like, as a woman in this industry, The Originals, in terms of the staff, is quite well-represented. I don’t feel the need to put my hand up to represent my gender, in this particular family of creatives. But I’m definitely interested in it, and it’s been really nice to watch my co-stars direct, over the last couple of years. I think I definitely would be interested, eventually.

Julie Plec intentionally left the door to New Orleans open in the series finale of The Vampire Diaries because she wanted to allow for the possibility of maybe seeing one of those characters again. Is there anyone from The Vampire Diaries that you’d like to see show up in New Orleans, either as an ally or an adversary for Hayley?
TONKIN:
I’ll say Candice [King], just ‘cause I love Candice and I’d love to hang out with her, during the day. So, I’d like to see Caroline Forbes show up.

The Originals airs on Friday nights on The CW.



I have completed the page for The Vampire Diaries’ season 8 Music. The complete list of songs for the eighth and final season can be found here but the music for the final two episodes can also be found below;

Episode Title: (815) We’re Planning a June Wedding”
Airdate: January 20th, 2017
[Episode Guide] [Music Guide] [Episode Stills] [Screencaptures]
Billie Holiday “I’m a Fool to Want You”
Lights & Motion “Silver Lining”
Lights & Motion “Perfect Symmetry”
Kaleb Jones “Till the World Stops Turning”
Goodbye June “Darlin'”
[Back To Top]

Episode Title: (816) I Was Feeling Epic
Airdate: March 10th, 2017
[Episode Guide] [Music Guide] [Episode Stills] [Screencaptures]
The Fray “Never Say Never”
Chord Overstreet “Hold On”
You Me At Six “Take on the World”
[Back To Top]

Episode Title: (817) The Vampire Diaries Special: Forever Yours
Airdate: March 10th, 2017
[Episode Guide] [Music Guide] [Episode Stills] [Screencaptures]
The Fray “Changing Tides”
The Fray “Never Say Never”
[Back To Top]



[Warning! The following contains major spoilers from the series finale of The Vampire Diaries. Read at your own risk!]

The Vampire Diaries series finale was not messing around. After making viewers think Damon (Ian Somerhalder) compelled Stefan (Paul Wesley) into letting the eldest Salvatore sacrifice himself to save Mystic Falls, “I Was Feeling Epic” delivered the devastating twist that Stefan was actually the one to die in TVD’s final hour.

But the series finale wasn’t all tears and heartbreak. It also gave us Damon and Elena (Nina Dobrev) getting their happy ending together, Caroline (Candice King) and Alaric (Matt Davis) opening up a school for (magically) gifted children and — most importantly — Stefan and Damon finally finding peace.

Co-creator Kevin Williamson spoke with TVGuide.com about why Stefan had to die, that Klaroline letter and the Delena proposal that had to be cut for time!

Why did you decide to end the series with Elena and Damon reuniting with their family in the afterlife?
Kevin Williamson:
Well, that’s a little interpretive, if you ask Julie [Plec], I believe. The idea was the montage shows a direction and we had our characters suggest what happened to them. And Damon, like the voiceover tell us, he was worried he would never see Stefan again. It was just Elena assuring him that there would be peace. That we’ve dealt with this other side of darkness for several seasons, but there’s also light out there and there’s peace, and Damon will find it. If you search for it, you will find it. And we wanted to get that last moment to see that yes, Elena found it and yes, Damon found it too, and it looked just like his brother.

Everyone else looks approximately the same age they were when they died. Why did Damon and Elena both still look so young? Did you just not want to mess with old age makeup?
Williamson:
You know, it is interpretive. The idea that this whole show was about loss and grief and losing people and ultimately, I guess the final message is that all these people who shaped and guided us along the way live within us and if you look within, you find peace. And so we kind of stepped out of reality in that moment and showed what that would look like. In reality, they did live lives and they did grow old. But in the voiceover, I can’t remember it word for word, but I think she says, “Damon will find peace.” And we know what that peace looks like. And then she looks to the porch and sees her family and then Damon returns to his home and sees Stefan.

I loved that the final shot was of Stefan and Damon together.
Williamson:
That was important. Well, the important thing for me, I can’t speak for anyone else, but the important thing for me was that I wanted the last lines to be the last lines.

“Hello brother” has become such an important line in this show. When you were working on the pilot, did you have any idea of the significance that phrase would come to have?
Williamson:
No, but there’s always those lines. Like in Dawson’s Creek it was, “See you, Joey.” And so it’s the same thing kind of. And I wanted a “Dear diary.” That was the other line that was really important. I wanted Elena to say, “Dear diary.” Originally in the montage, it started with everyone else and ended with Elena. And then at the last second I was like, “No, no, no. We have to start with ‘Dear diary.’ We have to put her in the graveyard.” And Julie was like, “Yes, yes, yes!” And then we started it and ended it with her.

Do you have any other favorite callbacks that you managed to work into the finale?
Williamson:
My favorite line was, “That’s for me to know and you to dot dot dot.” I’ve always liked that line and I used to say that. That was something I would just say all the time as a writer because you’d always write dot dot dot. And so I’d always go, “You know, blah blah blah, dot dot dot.” And so I’d always just say it in the writers’ room when I was explaining something. “Well, you know the rest, dot dot dot.” And then I put it in the line and I felt like, “You know what? Katherine’s older than Damon. Where did Damon get the line? Oh, he got it from Katherine. Let’s have Katherine say it.”

The show started out about two brothers fighting over a girl, but became much more about the intricacies of the brothers’ relationships than any one romance. When did you first notice that shift happening?
Williamson:
From the beginning we wanted to write a show about a family. The show was about family and loss and grief, because it was really about Elena losing her family. And it started off with her and Jeremy dealing with the worst-case scenario. And then of course, how do they find that family? And for Jeremy, it was how does he find his way, and for Elena, it was how does she find life again, and then once she comes to life, how will she ever be able to trust someone to love them? And then the triangle opened up. But it was always about Stefan and Elena both dealing with loss and grief and trying to learn how to live again. And she turned towards some good vampires along the way.

Julie told me that up until two weeks before the script was written, someone else was supposed to die. Can you reveal who that was?
Williamson:
Oh, everyone was supposed to die. There were so many conversations in the writers’ room. Everyone had these great ideas. I’m only sad that we couldn’t put everything in there because it was only 42.5 minutes. But there were so many possibilities. It was very important for us not to kill Bonnie. Bonnie should not have to die for Elena’s happiness. It was this conversation of, “Oh, Bonnie can go be with Enzo because that’s exactly what she would want.” Like, no. That’s not what Enzo would want. Bonnie needs a full, rich life. She needs a happy ending. So that was important to us, so we couldn’t kill Bonnie. And we can’t kill [Matt], because if he’s lived this long as a human, he needs to continue on. If we were going to kill him, it had to have been in Season 4. You can’t do it in Season 8. It was really between Damon and Stefan. You know, we got rid of Katherine. We killed Katherine. We knew we were going to take her out. There was a conversation that Damon and Stefan both died. And then there was a conversation that it just ended with Damon killing Katherine and saving the town and saving everyone. For me, where the story was when I came in and got involved, Stefan had just been the Ripper for a long period of time and killed Enzo. And the only way for him to come back from that, I felt, was to kill him. That’s why he had to die.

The Lexi (Arielle Kebbel) appearance after Stefan died made his death much easier to bear. Why do you think Lexi was the perfect person to lead him into the afterlife?
Williamson:
She was always there for him. She always had his back since Day 1. I think she showed up in the series, and because of her, you liked him more. Once you learned, oh, they’re best friends. And once we figured out who she was and what she did, in that one little moment she propped Stefan up for Elena when they were getting to know each other. And seeing Lexi gave us another whole side of Stefan at a time when he was just a brooding vampire. It just sort of opened him up a little bit. You’re like, “Oh man. How did they end up friends? I’m interested in that girl. Now I’m interested more in Stefan.” It really helped shape him as a character. And she’s always been there for him. It turns out she was the one who helped him with being a Ripper. She’s just always been there for him and had his back. She’s perfect.

A recurring issue in this show has been the idea that Stefan is the better man, but the finale indicates otherwise. Do you believe that Damon really is the better man?
Williamson:
I think that’s kind of what Katherine said and I think she was doing it because what happened was Damon became the better man. And I think that’s the eternal arc, is that he truly became everything his brother wanted. He became everything his brother was hoping he would become. And because his brother sacrificed himself for him, Damon got to live a better life.

Stefan sacrificed himself almost immediately after his wedding to Caroline. Are you at all nervous about the reaction from the Steroline fandom?
Williamson:
Yeah, that one’s a little tricky, possibly. I hope that the audience understands though that the greater good, which is that Stefan — he kind of said it to her. “You’re not going to put your children in harm’s way ever. It’s always going to be about family. You understand that more than anyone. And because it’s always about family, you’re going to understand what I’m about to do.” And she understood it. “It’s always about family.” And she didn’t like it and life hurts and life is painful, but she understood it. And we also threw in a little nugget of Klaus (Joseph Morgan) with the letter!

Why did you decide to include that letter and hint at Klaus and Caroline having a future together?
Williamson:
That’s the one storyline that we sacrificed. You know, Klaus went off to another series and we never really got to play that story out, because had Klaus stuck around, clearly that would have been a relationship and road we would have gone down for at least a storyline. I miss that storyline. I always wanted to see it. But things happen. No regrets, for sure.

The letter definitely felt like nice ways to honor one of the show’s most passionate fandoms. When working on the finale, how did your desire to please the fans influence the process?
Williamson:
That was the guiding force. That was the whole thing. Julie and the writers, we were like, “We have to say thank you.” We started talking about finales in general and why we like finales and which ones we like and why do you like them and why don’t you like them. And we felt that when we watch finales, we like being rewarded. What you really want the finale to do is say thank you. And so that was our goal and I really hope the audience understands. And it really is hard to please everyone. And in another universe, if Elena hadn’t left the show in Season 6, we might have had another ending because I am a Stelena ‘shipper, always. But this ending just makes me cry and makes me smile at the same time, and that’s what we really wanted to do. We wanted to cry, cry through laughter.

Based on the massive ring on Elena’s finger, she and Damon got married in the future! Was there any talk of ever showing some of the nuptials onscreen?
Williamson:
Yes. We actually had a moment, which we didn’t have time for — everything got cut. I think the first cut came in 18 minutes over. And there was a moment in the show where he proposed and she responded after medical school. And the whole point of that moment was just to show that she became a doctor. And so we thought, “Oh, we’ll just put her in scrubs and we can cut that piece.”

Bonnie is now off traveling the world and living her life to the fullest, so how has her dynamic with Enzo’s (Michael Malarkey) spirit changed? Are they still actively involved or does he only watch her from afar?
Williamson:
He’s watching from afar. He’s going to let her have her life and live her life. I imagine that’s what peace looks like — is those people who guided us and shaped us and who we loved are always going to be there within us. And we just visually showed what that looked like.

Do you imagine that when Bonnie (Kat Graham) does eventually die, she’ll be reunited with Enzo again?
Williamson:
If that’s what she wants, I think she will be, because that’s what peace is.

When we get glimpses into everyone’s future, they’re all off doing these great things and being with the people they love, but Matt’s (Zach Roerig) big accomplishment is getting a bench in his honor. What do you think that says about who Matt is and what his priorities are?
Williamson:
I think when we first started, Matt didn’t know who he was. He felt like the bad pawn of some reckless parents. He had such a dysfunctional family. And he came into his own. He became a man people look up to and applauded. And he’s also been in a lot of ways the gatekeeper of Mystic Falls now and he’s prepared for it. And now he’s going to have an entire community of people counting on him. He’s turned into this beaming light of responsibility and courage and he’s truly — I think he’s a hero. We just see a bench, but the thing about having a bench dedicated to you, you usually deserve a lot more than that. I have a feeling that bench was representative of a lot more.

What do hope The Vampire Diaries legacy will be?
Williamson:
I would hope that people look back on it with a big smile and that it’s nothing but great memories. You want people to remember it fondly and go, “Wow. I loved that show. Boy, was it a great show.” Big ol’ smile.



As Vampire Diaries fans know, death isn’t always permanent. With that in mind, the show might’ve ended, but is there hope that it will pull a Jeremy Gilbert and miraculously come back to life?

There are no plans at the moment, but according to TVD and Originals showrunner Julie Plec, there are still stories to be told.

“My hope is The Originals will stay on and that I can bring some of these characters over there,” Plec says of the Vampire Diaries spinoff. But if that doesn’t work out, there’s another option. “I could see our universes coming together in five years, 10 years, when people miss the shows,” she says. “There’s still stories to be told for The Originals that our characters here very smoothly and seamlessly fit into, so if we don’t get to do that while The Originals is still on the air, I think that one day, if somebody wanted it badly enough, it could exist.”

Speaking to how that could come together on a technical level considering TVD seemed to flash forward to the end of Damon and Elena’s life at the conclusion of the series finale, Plec notes that Elena mentioned a “long and happy life” in her voiceover.

“That leaves a nice 70-year window to fill in the blanks,” Plec says.

One final note: For those worried that Stefan’s death means he wouldn’t be a part of any future stories, fear not. If there were a future opportunity to tell more stories, Plec feels they could find a way to make sure both Salvatores would return.

[EW.com]



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